China, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Mongol Empire and Division

Mongol Empire (1206–1240s CE) Genghis Khan united the Mongol tribes of the steppes and became Great Khan in 1206. Genghis Khan and his successors expanded the Mongol empire across Asia. Under the reign of Genghis' third son, Ögedei Khan, the Mongols destroyed the weakened Jin dynasty in 1234, conquering most of northern China.[ Ögedei offered… Continue reading Mongol Empire and Division

China, Chuy, History, Horse Back, Kyrgyzstan

Turkic (Göktürks) Khaganate (552 CE –744 CE)

n medieval Inner Asia. Under the leadership of Bumin Qaghan (d. 552) and his sons, the Ashina succeeded the Rouran Khaganate as the hegemonic power of the Mongolian Plateau and rapidly expanded their territories in Central Asia. Initially the Khaganate would use Sogdian (See my post about these interesting traders) in official and numismatic functions. It was the first Turkic state to use the name Türk politically and is known for the first written record of any Turkic language in history. The first Turkic Khaganate collapsed in 581, after which followed a series of conflicts and civil wars which separated the polity into the Eastern Turkic Khaganate and Western Turkic Khaganate.

Almaty, Bishkek, Bukhara, China, Chuy, Fergana Valley, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kokand, Kyrgyzstan, Osh, Samarkind, Taraz, Tian Shan Mountains, Trans Alay Range, Uzbekistan

Russian Conquest of Central Asia

The Russian Conquest of Central Asia took place in the second half of the nineteenth century. The land that became Russian Turkestan and later Soviet Central Asia is now divided between Kazakhstan in the north, Uzbekistan across the center, Kyrgyzstan in the east, Tajikistan in the southeast and Turkmenistan in the southwest. The area was called Turkestan because most of its inhabitants spoke Turkic languages with the exception of Tajikistan, which speaks an Iranian language.

Chuy, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Prehistory, Russia, Silk Road, Tian Shan Mountains, Trans Alay Range, Uncategorized

Sintashta Culture

The Sintashta culture is widely regarded as the origin of the Indo-Iranian languages. The earliest known chariots have been found in Sintashta burials, and the culture is considered a strong candidate for the origin of the technology, which spread throughout the Old World and played an important role in ancient warfare.  Sintashta settlements are also remarkable for the intensity of copper mining and bronze metallurgy carried out there, which is unusual for a steppe culture

China, Chuy, Fergana Valley, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Osh Region, Prehistory, Russia, Silk Road, Tajikistan, Tour, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Bronze Age in Central Asia

Evidence of wheat, copper and millet gives clues to the first connections between West and East were made in the Bronze Age and archaeologists are finding clues of the specific routes that were taken. A current best guess is for a steppe connection at the beginning of the third millennium BC (3000 BCE) and a ‘silk road’ connection at the end of the 3rd millennium (2000 BCE).  However, a much earlier connection (the sixth millennium BC) is still arguable

China, History, Horse Back, Issyl Kul, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Nomad Games, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

2018 Nomad Games – Arm Wrestling

In international arm wrestling competitions, athletes fight standing at a special table. Their elbows abut on pillows. The winner is the one who first makes reach the hand (palm) of rival out to the cushion. Competitions are held on both the right and the left hand. Men Up to 75 kg, up to 95 kg… Continue reading 2018 Nomad Games – Arm Wrestling