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Andijan, China, Fergana Valley, History, Jalal-Abad, Kashgar, Khujand, Kokand, Kyrgyzstan, Osh, Osh Region, Russia, Tajikistan, Uncategorized, Uzbekistan

Khanate of Kokand

The Khanate of Kokand  (sometimes spelled Khoqand) was a Central Asian state in Fergana Valley that existed from 1709–1876 within the territory of modern Kyrgyzstan, eastern Uzbekistan  and  Tajikistan, and southeastern Kazakhstan. Kokand  is located in eastern Uzbekistan, at the southwestern edge of the Fergana Valley.   It is the main transportation junction in the Fergana Valley and has a population of about 200,000 .  The city lies… Continue reading Khanate of Kokand

Bukhara, History, Silk Road, Uzbekistan

Khanate and Emirate of Bukhara

The Khanate of Bukhara was a Central Asian  state from 1506 to 1785, followed by the  Emirate of Bukhara  from 1785 to 1920 in what is now modern-day  Uzbekistan. It occupied the land between the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, known formerly as Transoxiana. Today the territory of the defunct emirate lies mostly in Uzbekistan,… Continue reading Khanate and Emirate of Bukhara

Almaty, Bishkek, Bukhara, China, Chuy, Fergana Valley, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kokand, Kyrgyzstan, Osh, Samarkind, Taraz, Tian Shan Mountains, Trans Alay Range, Uzbekistan

Russian Conquest of Central Asia

The Russian Conquest of Central Asia took place in the second half of the nineteenth century. The land that became Russian Turkestan and later Soviet Central Asia is now divided between Kazakhstan in the north, Uzbekistan across the center, Kyrgyzstan in the east, Tajikistan in the southeast and Turkmenistan in the southwest. The area was called Turkestan because most of its inhabitants spoke Turkic languages with the exception of Tajikistan, which speaks an Iranian language.

Chuy, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Prehistory, Russia, Silk Road, Tian Shan Mountains, Trans Alay Range, Uncategorized

Sintashta Culture

The Sintashta culture is widely regarded as the origin of the Indo-Iranian languages. The earliest known chariots have been found in Sintashta burials, and the culture is considered a strong candidate for the origin of the technology, which spread throughout the Old World and played an important role in ancient warfare.  Sintashta settlements are also remarkable for the intensity of copper mining and bronze metallurgy carried out there, which is unusual for a steppe culture

China, Chuy, Fergana Valley, History, Horse Back, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Osh Region, Prehistory, Russia, Silk Road, Tajikistan, Tour, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Bronze Age in Central Asia

Evidence of wheat, copper and millet gives clues to the first connections between West and East were made in the Bronze Age and archaeologists are finding clues of the specific routes that were taken. A current best guess is for a steppe connection at the beginning of the third millennium BC (3000 BCE) and a ‘silk road’ connection at the end of the 3rd millennium (2000 BCE).  However, a much earlier connection (the sixth millennium BC) is still arguable